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Tenant's Page

EMERGENCY CHECKLIST

PLEASE KEEP HANDY AT ALL TIMES

 

1. NO ELECTRICITY

  1. Check circuit breaker
  2. Look at utility meter, is it running? Is it tilted? Has the bill been paid?
  3. Is their electricity in the neighborhood?
  4. If there is no power in the bathroom, check the reset button on the outlet. Typically this is located in the bathroom but in some homes it may be located in a different area (i.e. garage).
  5. Is the utility department working in the neighborhood? Any construction going on in the neighborhood?
  6. Call utility department.

 

2. FLOODING

  1. Locate and turn the water off immediately.
  2. Where is it coming from? Water heater, water spicket, ground water?
  3. Foundation cracks?
  4. Broken pipe under the sink?
  5. If you have a sump pump, is it working?
  6. Will you need water extraction?
  7. Call COLORADO PEAK REAL ESTATE 719-648-9345  IMMEDIATELY for EMERGENCY MAINT.

 

3. NO HEAT

  1. Is the pilot light on?

·      Call the gas company

·      If you try and light the pilot, will it stay lit?

  1. Is the blower working correctly?

·      Does the blower come on?

·      Does it blow warm air?

  1. If the pilot is on, is the thermostat set properly?
  2. Is the door to the furnace itself shut tight?
  3. Can the situation wait until first thing in the morning?

 

4. FENCE DOWN

  1. Is the fence down due to wind?
  2. Do you have an animal that needs to be contained within the fence?
  3. Call COLORADO PEAK REAL ESTATE 719-648-9345 on the next business day and report it to your property manager.

 

 

5. SHINGLES BLOWN OFF THE ROOF

  1. Is the roof leaking?
  2. Is there an excessive amount?
  3. Call COLORADO PEAK REAL ESTATE 719-648-9345 and report the problem to the property manager.

 

6. WINDOW BROKEN OUT

  1. What caused the window to break?
  2. If necessary, did you get a police report?
  3. Please cover the window with a piece of wood until we can get someone to replace it.

 

7. FIRE

  1. Call 911
  2. Get everyone out of the house/unit.
  3. Call COLORADO PEAK REAL ESTATE IMMEDIATELY to report.

 

8. LEAKING HOT WATER HEATER

  1. Turn off water to hot water heater IMMEDIATELY
  2. Use existing hot water sparingly
  3. If water can be turned off and maintained, call COLORADO PEAK REAL ESTATE  the next morning for service.

 

9. NO HOT WATER

Check hot water heater, is the unit warm? Is the pilot on?

Run other taps to determine if it is just one line.

If you find a leaking pipe, turn water off at that pipe.

Call COLORADO PEAK REAEL ESTATE IMMEDIATELY.

 

 

*** This is to be used as a guideline to help you,

but may not cover every situation that may happen in your home. ***

DEPOSIT REFUND HINTS

NOTE THAT THE BELOW INFORMATION WAS WRITTEN AND PROVIDED BY A 3RD PARTY SOURCE. IT DOES NOT EXCUSE YOU OF ABIDING BY THE CLEANING AND CONDITIONS UPON MOVE OUT

How does a renter avoid conflict from the start? Start when you move in, being sure to do a complete walk-through of the premises. Most leases decree that the unit “is to be returned in the same condition as when first rented, less wear and tear”. Your task at hand is to establish exactly what condition the place was in from the start.

Where to begin? Hopefully the landlord will provide a walk-through or inventory checklist at move-in. If not, create your own.

If possible, draw out a basic floor plan on a sheet of paper. Label the rooms, and indicate where windows and doors are placed to help narrow down the details. Bring a camera to back up any notable items, especially those already damaged, such as peeling paint. For each room, make note of the following items:

·        The paint and how it looks. If the unit was freshly painted top to bottom, that’s the threshold, you’ll be responsible for. If just a few walls, say the kitchen and baths are painted, make careful note of that condition. Be sure to “look up, down and all around” when checking the condition of the paint.

·        Floors. Every type has its weak spots. For example, wood floors can be easily scratched and expensive to refinish. Ask what steps are needed to keep them in good condition.

·        Vinyl or linoleum underfoot? Flooring seams are notorious for splitting, especially where water can seep in around sinks and bathtubs. Check carefully for any pull-ups or binding.

·       Window coverings should be checked. Even though most jurisdictions don’t require window coverings, such as blinds or drapes, many landlords include them at move-in. If none exist or only on certain windows, jot it down.

·       Don’t overlook the screens. While not terribly expensive, replacing several can add up. While you’re looking out the windows, be sure the glass isn’t cracked or broken, and that all windows open, close and lock properly.

·       Light fixtures should brighten your list, too. A flip of a switch will determine if fixtures work as they should. Ask if there are any master switches, typically found in living rooms that control an outlet or two.

·       Smoke detectors. A must-have for every bedroom and some hallways, check that the alarms are fully functional. Simply press the test button, usually at the center of the detector.

·       Drains. Run the water a few minutes. If they don’t drain freely, add that to your “please repair” list.

·       Kitchen. With appliances galore, there’s much to explore. Open the oven. Is it spotlessly clean or caked with grease: Do all the burners’ fire? Does the garbage disposal hum when switched on or simply groan with trapped debris?

·       Bathroom. Built-ins such as soap dishes and towel racks should be in top shape. Be sure the tub/shower enclosure is clean and not hiding mold in the cracks.

·       How’s the appearance of the tile? Tile is expensive to replace, especially in older buildings where the classics are no longer available.

·       Jot down how many keys you are given at move-in, including the mailbox key. The number of remote control or security type keys should be noted, too.

Doing a good job of keeping track of the details can save you time, frustration and hopefully your security deposit at move-out. 

WHY WE DO NOT DO WALK THROUGHS TOGETHER 
There are many reasons that most property management companies do not perform joint walk-throughs with tenants when they vacate, but rather, do them on their own after the keys have been returned. This article was written to give a little bit of perspective to renters, who may be frustrated by this kind of policy. As a property manager who has done joint walk-throughs with tenants in the past , I do not believe it is the best practice. Joint walk-t hroughs can create more problems than they help (even for tenants).
 
1.)Tenants want to walk the property together, so that they can get an idea of what would or would not represent a charge against the security deposit. Unfortunately, when walking the property, there is no way that a property manager can?guarantee?what will or will not represent a charge against the security deposit. Documentation of the property, pre & post residency must be gathered and reviewed, this process is often a lengthy one. At our company, we are looking at our move-in report with photos, the tenants move-in report, and our move-out report with photos, it is quite the process. Also, after noting specific damages, if any are present, sometimes we need to discuss how best to handle the situation with our property management team and/or attorneys. Believe it or not, but we dont always have every answer immediately on property deposit accounting when trying to split hairs. There are many unique circumstances which may influence proper accounting, all of which are considered upon our review. When I had previously done move-outs walk-throughs with tenants (many years back), I cant tell you how many times the tenant felt that I told them they wouldnt be charged, or that I somehow represented what they would or would not be charged for, and this was after I disclosed before entering the home that I could not tell them anything about what or would not be held against their deposit. Just to give you some insight, just about EVERY tenant, good or bad, outstanding or awful, will say, that was like that when I moved in, and the home looks better now than when I got it. Both statements are rarely accurate.  I can count the number of tenants that said, that was me, I caused that damage on one hand. Pure integrity in this world, is quite rare.
 
2.)Imagine doing a joint walk through, and that you are pointing out issues to the tenant. In this example, lets say you noted several screw anchor holes and some problems with how clean the tenant left the unit. Well, now the tenant wants you to come back another day to give them more time, or to go room-by-room resolving items as you note them which can drastically extend the time that a move-out report takes. Additionally, the tenant may not have an eye for detail on making proper repairs or for cleaning in a way that is to a professional standard (per our lease). Now you get to tell them to their face that they are not gifted in those areas, and that no amount of repair/cleaning is going to satisfy the issue. Try to do this without them yelling at you, or immediately rating your company poorly. Believe it or not, some people simply cannot see it, they become blind or numb to problematic issues, one of my best friends is that way. He believes his condo is reasonably well kept, however it is in fact not well kept (you can't always see the floor). He just cant see it, and I'm sure we all know someone like that.
 
3.)Imagine being the target of everyones affection daily. As a property manager, we are by design, positioned between the homeowner and the tenant. Commonly, the tenant feels that home owner is just trying to rip them off and keep their deposit , and the owner feels like the tenant is responsible for every minuscule blemish. Imagine that your job is to essentially serve as a mediator, who ultima ely represents the home owner, but who also has an obligation and commitment to practice fair and honest business. Close your eyes for a moment , and imagine the challenge of that . You wouldn't want that job.
 
At Colorado Peak Real Estate, we work VERY hard to help everyone succeed. Our lease spells out quite clearly how the home is to be left, and we also provide a Move-out Cleaning Checklist (which also covers things like touch-up painting) to our tenants. We want to give our tenants back every cent of the security deposit, but we have an obligation to charge should the home not be left in the condition that it should be per the lease contract. Note that there may also be charges if the home was not maintained as described in our Maintenance Addendum, or if problems were left unreported which caused additional damage.
 
Finally, if you as a tenant ever feel that we mischarged, after vacating, please request a Deposit Dispute Form. Because, believe it or not, we aren't perfect. While we work tirelessly to ensure we serve all clients and customers in way that is error free we are human. After receipt of a dispute form from you, we are happy to take a second look at the deposit accounting and invoices to ensure no errors were made in the reconciliation.
 
I hope this article helped to give you a better understanding of our security deposit and move-in/move-out philosophy. Thank you!
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Colordao Peak Real Estate, INC.
2501 W Colorado Ave #110 • Colorado Springs, CO 80904
719-648-9345 • 719-640-2916
346-808-0920


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